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We haven’t heard about this many brand new #1’s from Marvel since The Heroic Age, or Marvel NOW, or All-New All-Different Marvel NOW, or Marvel Legacy, or… well, you get the idea. Despite the line-wide relaunch feeling like the same old instead of a “Fresh Start” that the company claims, we can’t help but still be excited about some of the upcoming titles being released.

Today we are going to look at Deadpool #1, which lands a new creative team that is sure to push the character in crazy new directions, and The Sentry #1, which follows the troubled character’s return to life in the pages of Doctor Strange.

Deadpool #1 by Skottie Young and Nic Klien

Deadpool’s gone through A LOT these past few years, and while he’s accomplished a lot, the merc with the mouth may have taken his eye off his mercenary business for a bit too long,” said series editor Jake Thomas. “So how does a soldier for hire get business back up and running? The only way Deadpool knows how: Maximum effort, reasonable rates.”

“Skottie Young has one of the wildest, most unhinged creative minds I’ve ever worked with, and I mean that as the sincerest compliment I can muster,” Thomas continues. “His ideas for Wade are flying fast and furious, this book is going to be a non-stop chaos party as Wade battles his way back on top of the mercenary game using every dirty trick, cheap sales tactic, crass promotional ploy, and underhanded advantage he can…and he’ll be bringing along some old friends for help. As for Nic Klein, he’s one of my favorite artists working, and the work he’s doing on this book is INCREDIBLE. I’ve seen Nic bring humor to a story, but I haven’t seen him go this wild…as a fan of his, an utter joy. You can see the fun he’s having right there in every panel. He’s completely owning every inch of this story. The character work, the world design, the action beats…honestly? It might be TOO good. [Editor] Mark Basso has had to hold me back multiple times from telling Nic to just stop because I can’t take the strange, beautiful glory of those pages anymore. That’s the pain I endure to bring you these amazing Deadpool stories. My blessing and my burden. You’re welcome.”

“Before I pitched Rocket Raccoon back in 2013, I tried to get Deadpool. haha,” Young wrote to Polygon, “But he was spoken for so I said ‘well, i can kind of have a similar vibe for Rocket, just cleaned up a bit.’ So my head was already in that place.”

That place is a Deadpool book that’s “Fast paced, big and humorous,” Young continued. “I like to write stories that move fast and keep you on the ride. And I like to try and make you laugh while someone his getting their arm broken or head exploded. hahaha. Similar to my run on Rocket, I like doing shorter stories and have threads that weave in and out.”

The humor inherent in a character like Deadpool — and his history of breaking the comic book fourth wall — appeals to Young, and to artist Nic Klein.

“Visually – besides the over the top-of-it-all business, I like the Deadpool specific things (his theatric monologues and breaking the 4th wall stuff),” Klein wrote to Polygon. “Experimenting with pacing / specific camera shots/angles to get comedic effect are also fun things that I hope to get to do. We’re just having fun doing it and I think it shows and will rub off on the readers.”

Deadpool #1 will hit stands on June 6.

The Sentry #1 by Jeff Lemire and Kim Jacinto (Cover by Bryan Hitch)

“Having made his dramatic and unexpected return in Donny Cates’ DOCTOR STRANGE story, it was a no-brainer for us to move ahead on an actual SENTRY series! And it was my great fortune that Jeff Lemire was eager to lend his talents to the project, as it will live in the sort of off-kilter headspace that his MOON KNIGHT and Black Hammer projects exist in,” said SVP and Executive Editor Tom Brevoort. “And Kim Jacinto, fresh off of AVENGERS: NO SURRENDER is the perfect artist to help visualize the worlds of this shining champion who’s also got a dark underbelly.”

“The Sentry is a fascinating character,” Lemire told Comicbook.com. “I absolutely loved the original Sentry series by Paul Jenkins and Jae Lee when it first came out, so I jumped at the chance to write the character. The Sentry has a lot of emotional depth and a lot for me to dig into in terms of the psychology of the character. He is immensely powerful and has the potential to be one of the greatest and most important heroes in the Marvel Universe, but he is constantly undermined by his own dark side and his own self-doubt.”

The Sentry’s dark side is more tangible and aggressive than most people’s. It manifests as the evil supervillain force called The Void, who seeks to undo all the good that Sentry does. Lemire hints that the Void – who is currently locked in Doctor Strange’s closet – will remain Sentry’s shadow in the new series.

“You cannot have The Sentry without the Void,” Lemire says. “But what I was very conscious of was not simply retelling the same stories that had been told in the past with Sentry and Void. I want to see their relationship and their characters evolve and go in new directions.”

The Sentry series will pick up some time after Sentry’s appearance in Doctor Strange. “Bob will begin to reconnect with the rest of the Marvel U again,” Lemire says. “In fact, our series will start a few months after the events in Donny Cates’ Doctor Strange, and Bob will already be reintegrated into the Marvel Universe a bit more.”

Jacinto says of his visual approach to The Sentry that “We are going with the traditional Sentry look but we have some surprises in store too.” One of those twists is seeing the Sentry active in two different universes, distinguished by Jacinto’s art vacillating between “a bit clean to dark and gritty.” Jacinto says its a challenge, but “drawing different realities are fun and sometimes fun takes out the challenge.”

Lemire has dealt with one of Marvel’s more mentally unstable character before during his run on Moon Knight, but he says the Sentry requires a different approach.

“Well, it’s is different since Sentry and Moon Knight both have very different issues,” Lemire explains. “In both cases, I wanted to craft a narrative structure that reflected those mental health issues and both series deal with multiple realities reflecting the inner landscape of the characters, so I suppose you could draw a comparison there. But The Sentry is not a retread of what I did in Moon Knight. But I did want to create a story filled with mystery and psychological depth like I did with Moon Knight.”

The Sentry #1 goes on sale in June.

Deadpool and The Sentry join other Fresh Start titles like The Avengers, Venom, Black Panther, Captain America, Thor, Ant-Man and The Wasp, Amazing Spider-Man, Multiple Man, Immortal Hulk, Captain Marvel & Doctor Strange!


Images: Marvel Comics

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About Scoot Allan

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Scoot Allan talks geek and writes stuff about stuff. He likes long walks to the bathroom, exercises non-regularly and has way too much hair - everywhere. He featured on the Geek Exchange Podcast, Grizzlybomb, WhatCulture, RoguePlanet.tv, BamKapow and The Urban 30.

Deadpool and The Sentry Join Marvel’s Fresh Start!

Deadpool gets a new creative team while The Sentry gets a new lease on life!

By Scoot Allan | 03/8/2018 11:00 AM PT

News

We haven’t heard about this many brand new #1’s from Marvel since The Heroic Age, or Marvel NOW, or All-New All-Different Marvel NOW, or Marvel Legacy, or… well, you get the idea. Despite the line-wide relaunch feeling like the same old instead of a “Fresh Start” that the company claims, we can’t help but still be excited about some of the upcoming titles being released.

Today we are going to look at Deadpool #1, which lands a new creative team that is sure to push the character in crazy new directions, and The Sentry #1, which follows the troubled character’s return to life in the pages of Doctor Strange.

Deadpool #1 by Skottie Young and Nic Klien

Deadpool’s gone through A LOT these past few years, and while he’s accomplished a lot, the merc with the mouth may have taken his eye off his mercenary business for a bit too long,” said series editor Jake Thomas. “So how does a soldier for hire get business back up and running? The only way Deadpool knows how: Maximum effort, reasonable rates.”

“Skottie Young has one of the wildest, most unhinged creative minds I’ve ever worked with, and I mean that as the sincerest compliment I can muster,” Thomas continues. “His ideas for Wade are flying fast and furious, this book is going to be a non-stop chaos party as Wade battles his way back on top of the mercenary game using every dirty trick, cheap sales tactic, crass promotional ploy, and underhanded advantage he can…and he’ll be bringing along some old friends for help. As for Nic Klein, he’s one of my favorite artists working, and the work he’s doing on this book is INCREDIBLE. I’ve seen Nic bring humor to a story, but I haven’t seen him go this wild…as a fan of his, an utter joy. You can see the fun he’s having right there in every panel. He’s completely owning every inch of this story. The character work, the world design, the action beats…honestly? It might be TOO good. [Editor] Mark Basso has had to hold me back multiple times from telling Nic to just stop because I can’t take the strange, beautiful glory of those pages anymore. That’s the pain I endure to bring you these amazing Deadpool stories. My blessing and my burden. You’re welcome.”

“Before I pitched Rocket Raccoon back in 2013, I tried to get Deadpool. haha,” Young wrote to Polygon, “But he was spoken for so I said ‘well, i can kind of have a similar vibe for Rocket, just cleaned up a bit.’ So my head was already in that place.”

That place is a Deadpool book that’s “Fast paced, big and humorous,” Young continued. “I like to write stories that move fast and keep you on the ride. And I like to try and make you laugh while someone his getting their arm broken or head exploded. hahaha. Similar to my run on Rocket, I like doing shorter stories and have threads that weave in and out.”

The humor inherent in a character like Deadpool — and his history of breaking the comic book fourth wall — appeals to Young, and to artist Nic Klein.

“Visually – besides the over the top-of-it-all business, I like the Deadpool specific things (his theatric monologues and breaking the 4th wall stuff),” Klein wrote to Polygon. “Experimenting with pacing / specific camera shots/angles to get comedic effect are also fun things that I hope to get to do. We’re just having fun doing it and I think it shows and will rub off on the readers.”

Deadpool #1 will hit stands on June 6.

The Sentry #1 by Jeff Lemire and Kim Jacinto (Cover by Bryan Hitch)

“Having made his dramatic and unexpected return in Donny Cates’ DOCTOR STRANGE story, it was a no-brainer for us to move ahead on an actual SENTRY series! And it was my great fortune that Jeff Lemire was eager to lend his talents to the project, as it will live in the sort of off-kilter headspace that his MOON KNIGHT and Black Hammer projects exist in,” said SVP and Executive Editor Tom Brevoort. “And Kim Jacinto, fresh off of AVENGERS: NO SURRENDER is the perfect artist to help visualize the worlds of this shining champion who’s also got a dark underbelly.”

“The Sentry is a fascinating character,” Lemire told Comicbook.com. “I absolutely loved the original Sentry series by Paul Jenkins and Jae Lee when it first came out, so I jumped at the chance to write the character. The Sentry has a lot of emotional depth and a lot for me to dig into in terms of the psychology of the character. He is immensely powerful and has the potential to be one of the greatest and most important heroes in the Marvel Universe, but he is constantly undermined by his own dark side and his own self-doubt.”

The Sentry’s dark side is more tangible and aggressive than most people’s. It manifests as the evil supervillain force called The Void, who seeks to undo all the good that Sentry does. Lemire hints that the Void – who is currently locked in Doctor Strange’s closet – will remain Sentry’s shadow in the new series.

“You cannot have The Sentry without the Void,” Lemire says. “But what I was very conscious of was not simply retelling the same stories that had been told in the past with Sentry and Void. I want to see their relationship and their characters evolve and go in new directions.”

The Sentry series will pick up some time after Sentry’s appearance in Doctor Strange. “Bob will begin to reconnect with the rest of the Marvel U again,” Lemire says. “In fact, our series will start a few months after the events in Donny Cates’ Doctor Strange, and Bob will already be reintegrated into the Marvel Universe a bit more.”

Jacinto says of his visual approach to The Sentry that “We are going with the traditional Sentry look but we have some surprises in store too.” One of those twists is seeing the Sentry active in two different universes, distinguished by Jacinto’s art vacillating between “a bit clean to dark and gritty.” Jacinto says its a challenge, but “drawing different realities are fun and sometimes fun takes out the challenge.”

Lemire has dealt with one of Marvel’s more mentally unstable character before during his run on Moon Knight, but he says the Sentry requires a different approach.

“Well, it’s is different since Sentry and Moon Knight both have very different issues,” Lemire explains. “In both cases, I wanted to craft a narrative structure that reflected those mental health issues and both series deal with multiple realities reflecting the inner landscape of the characters, so I suppose you could draw a comparison there. But The Sentry is not a retread of what I did in Moon Knight. But I did want to create a story filled with mystery and psychological depth like I did with Moon Knight.”

The Sentry #1 goes on sale in June.

Deadpool and The Sentry join other Fresh Start titles like The Avengers, Venom, Black Panther, Captain America, Thor, Ant-Man and The Wasp, Amazing Spider-Man, Multiple Man, Immortal Hulk, Captain Marvel & Doctor Strange!


Images: Marvel Comics

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



Connect

About Scoot Allan

view all posts

Scoot Allan talks geek and writes stuff about stuff. He likes long walks to the bathroom, exercises non-regularly and has way too much hair - everywhere. He featured on the Geek Exchange Podcast, Grizzlybomb, WhatCulture, RoguePlanet.tv, BamKapow and The Urban 30.