X

REGISTER TO CUSTOMIZE
YOUR NEWS AND GET ALERTS
ON Comics

Click the box below to confirm you are over 13, not a robot, and agree to our Privacy Policy & Terms and Conditions
No thanks, take me to
X
Customize your news
for instant alerts on
Comics
Register below
(it only takes seconds)
Click the box below to confirm you are over 13, not a robot, and agree to our Privacy Policy & Terms and Conditions


X
X
Comics


 

Doomsday Clock, a 12-issue DC Comics miniseries based on Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen that could be considered both a sequel, a crossover and a response has been making waves since its second issue was released earlier this month. Geoff Johns and Gary Frank’s series has already deepened the world of the DC Universe and Watchmen with just two issues, but is also making moves with another classic DC story by Alan Moore, released only a year after his monumental achievement in 1987.

In Issue #2 of Doomsday Clock, Ozymandias and the new Rorschach (who was referred to as “Reggie”), Marionette, and The Mime journey to the new world to track down Doctor Manhattan, who is the best chance to save the planet. Their journey takes them to Earth-0, which is the center of the DC Multiverse, and it is there that the foursome encounters a familiar location to many Batman fans.

Doomsday Clock

New Rorschach and Ozymandias crash land the Owlship in an abandoned amusement park that has definitely seen better days. The locales such as the Fun House, Ferris Wheel, Tower, and Pink Elephant (see the image below) are all dead giveaways that this the same amusement park from Alan Moore and Brian Bolland’s Batman: The Killing Joke.

Although there have been smatterings of many other DC references throughout the series already, The Killing Joke reference might be the quietest of the lot, done without a single word of text. The setting was largely set in such a park that the Joker used to psychologically torture Gotham police commissioner Jim Gordon. The amusement park connection postulates that The Killing Joke is part of the history of the Rebirth continuity. DC Comics: Rebirth #1 debuted last year, which left fans speculating as to which past stories remain official canon and which have been left out. Doomsday Clock #2 confirms that one of DC’s most notorious stories is now part of the Rebirth and Earth-0 canon.

The Killing Joke

The Killing Joke involved the infamous crippling of Barbara Gordon, thus ending her career as Batgirl and leaving her wheelchair-bound. She then became the information broker known as Oracle before The New 52 reestablished her as Batgirl. The Killing Joke was also adapted into a DC Animated Movie, which while praised for the performances of the voice actors (primarily Mark Hamill’s reprisal of his role as the Joker), was met with a polarized response largely stemming from controversy due to the addition of a subplot that portrayed a sex scene between Batgirl and Batman.

Of course, this all could just be a visceral nod. Something to honor Alan Moore’s long-tenure over at DC. However, it could also be paving the way for bigger reveals that will certainly stir up the pot before Doomsday Clock‘s 12-issue run is up.

The Killing Joke

Doomsday Clock #2 is in comic shops and online now.


Images: DC

0   POINTS
0   POINTS


Connect

About Mitchell Corner

view all posts

Born and raised in Toronto, Ontario of the Great White North, Mitchell has written for GEEK, Portal 13, Grizzlybomb, and The Richest. Though his obsession for film often outweighs everything else, his writing includes reviews and editorials on TV, digital media, and all things Geeky.

Doomsday Clock Makes The Killing Joke Official DC Rebirth Canon

Doomsday Clock #2 brought the Watchmen and DC universes closer than ever as it embraced another Alan Moore story.

By Mitchell Corner | 01/1/2018 09:00 AM PT

News

Doomsday Clock, a 12-issue DC Comics miniseries based on Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen that could be considered both a sequel, a crossover and a response has been making waves since its second issue was released earlier this month. Geoff Johns and Gary Frank’s series has already deepened the world of the DC Universe and Watchmen with just two issues, but is also making moves with another classic DC story by Alan Moore, released only a year after his monumental achievement in 1987.

In Issue #2 of Doomsday Clock, Ozymandias and the new Rorschach (who was referred to as “Reggie”), Marionette, and The Mime journey to the new world to track down Doctor Manhattan, who is the best chance to save the planet. Their journey takes them to Earth-0, which is the center of the DC Multiverse, and it is there that the foursome encounters a familiar location to many Batman fans.

Doomsday Clock

New Rorschach and Ozymandias crash land the Owlship in an abandoned amusement park that has definitely seen better days. The locales such as the Fun House, Ferris Wheel, Tower, and Pink Elephant (see the image below) are all dead giveaways that this the same amusement park from Alan Moore and Brian Bolland’s Batman: The Killing Joke.

Although there have been smatterings of many other DC references throughout the series already, The Killing Joke reference might be the quietest of the lot, done without a single word of text. The setting was largely set in such a park that the Joker used to psychologically torture Gotham police commissioner Jim Gordon. The amusement park connection postulates that The Killing Joke is part of the history of the Rebirth continuity. DC Comics: Rebirth #1 debuted last year, which left fans speculating as to which past stories remain official canon and which have been left out. Doomsday Clock #2 confirms that one of DC’s most notorious stories is now part of the Rebirth and Earth-0 canon.

The Killing Joke

The Killing Joke involved the infamous crippling of Barbara Gordon, thus ending her career as Batgirl and leaving her wheelchair-bound. She then became the information broker known as Oracle before The New 52 reestablished her as Batgirl. The Killing Joke was also adapted into a DC Animated Movie, which while praised for the performances of the voice actors (primarily Mark Hamill’s reprisal of his role as the Joker), was met with a polarized response largely stemming from controversy due to the addition of a subplot that portrayed a sex scene between Batgirl and Batman.

Of course, this all could just be a visceral nod. Something to honor Alan Moore’s long-tenure over at DC. However, it could also be paving the way for bigger reveals that will certainly stir up the pot before Doomsday Clock‘s 12-issue run is up.

The Killing Joke

Doomsday Clock #2 is in comic shops and online now.


Images: DC

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



Connect

About Mitchell Corner

view all posts

Born and raised in Toronto, Ontario of the Great White North, Mitchell has written for GEEK, Portal 13, Grizzlybomb, and The Richest. Though his obsession for film often outweighs everything else, his writing includes reviews and editorials on TV, digital media, and all things Geeky.