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With an official ruling that reads more like a legal brief than something related to 8-bit classic gaming, Twin Galaxies – largely recognized as a top arbiter and keeper of video-gaming records — has stripped Billy Mitchell of not only his lofty Donkey Kong record, but all of his records, and banned him from the leaderboards to boot. Mitchell, along with Steve Wiebe, was a primary focus of the popular 2007 documentary, The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters.

Previously, Mitchell was recognized as the first player to crack one million points on Donkey Kong, an honor that now retroactively applies to Wiebe. Current top-score record holder Robbie Lakeman has crushed both since the documentary; his current high score on Donkey Kong is an amazing 1,247,700. But why was Mitchell removed from the records? A dispute was brought against the validity of Mitchell’s records based on the assertion that they were not achieved using original Donkey Kong arcade hardware, and rather using MAME (emulation software), or, at minimum, “not from an original unmodified DK arcade PCB (printed circuit board).”

While the text of the finding states that Mitchell did not participate in this investigation (i.e., provide evidence to support his records). Wiebe did offer some commentary to the Twin Galaxies news site, saying, among other things, that “A lot of friends have fired off articles of me being the first to a million, and that’s something that I always wanted to be known for back in the day.” Additionally, he gave credit to Jace Hall, who acquired Twin Galaxies a few years ago, for implementing “a new dispute system where gamers can look at old scores and analyze things like Billy’s.”

Guinness World Records, which relies on Twin Galaxies for verification of such classic video-gaming records, has also expunged Mr. Mitchell’s records from its storied pages, both pertaining to Donkey Kong and Pac-Man. As Guinness World Records told Kotaku, the organization “will look to update and find the appropriate holder of these records in the next few days.”

Mitchell issued a response on Sunday from the Midwest Gaming Classic via the Twitter stream of YouTuber Keemstar. You can check out the video of Mitchell’s response below – but some of the highlights of his statement include inferring that the new Twin Galaxies regime possesses a “shock jock mentality designed to create hits” and that he is in the process of gathering the seemingly immense amount of archival documentation that will clear his good name.

What do you think about both Mitchell’s statement and the removal of his records? Let us know on the GEEKFB!


Images: LargeLab, Nintendo

Source: Twin Galaxies

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Kong-troversy: Billy Mitchell’s ‘Donkey Kong’ Records Stripped

The focus of documentary 'King of Kong' kicked from leaderboards, and we have his first statement...

By Jeremy Nisen | 04/17/2018 08:00 AM PT | Updated 04/17/2018 08:47 AM PT

News

With an official ruling that reads more like a legal brief than something related to 8-bit classic gaming, Twin Galaxies – largely recognized as a top arbiter and keeper of video-gaming records — has stripped Billy Mitchell of not only his lofty Donkey Kong record, but all of his records, and banned him from the leaderboards to boot. Mitchell, along with Steve Wiebe, was a primary focus of the popular 2007 documentary, The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters.

Previously, Mitchell was recognized as the first player to crack one million points on Donkey Kong, an honor that now retroactively applies to Wiebe. Current top-score record holder Robbie Lakeman has crushed both since the documentary; his current high score on Donkey Kong is an amazing 1,247,700. But why was Mitchell removed from the records? A dispute was brought against the validity of Mitchell’s records based on the assertion that they were not achieved using original Donkey Kong arcade hardware, and rather using MAME (emulation software), or, at minimum, “not from an original unmodified DK arcade PCB (printed circuit board).”

While the text of the finding states that Mitchell did not participate in this investigation (i.e., provide evidence to support his records). Wiebe did offer some commentary to the Twin Galaxies news site, saying, among other things, that “A lot of friends have fired off articles of me being the first to a million, and that’s something that I always wanted to be known for back in the day.” Additionally, he gave credit to Jace Hall, who acquired Twin Galaxies a few years ago, for implementing “a new dispute system where gamers can look at old scores and analyze things like Billy’s.”

Guinness World Records, which relies on Twin Galaxies for verification of such classic video-gaming records, has also expunged Mr. Mitchell’s records from its storied pages, both pertaining to Donkey Kong and Pac-Man. As Guinness World Records told Kotaku, the organization “will look to update and find the appropriate holder of these records in the next few days.”

Mitchell issued a response on Sunday from the Midwest Gaming Classic via the Twitter stream of YouTuber Keemstar. You can check out the video of Mitchell’s response below – but some of the highlights of his statement include inferring that the new Twin Galaxies regime possesses a “shock jock mentality designed to create hits” and that he is in the process of gathering the seemingly immense amount of archival documentation that will clear his good name.

What do you think about both Mitchell’s statement and the removal of his records? Let us know on the GEEKFB!


Images: LargeLab, Nintendo

Source: Twin Galaxies

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About Jeremy Nisen

view all posts

Nisen writes stuff, usually geeky. Powered by coffee and moderated by bourbon.