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Novelist and comic book writer Peter David, best known for dozens of Star Trek novelizations and for his work on Marvel comics like The Incredible Hulk, hinted this week on Twitter that he’d be very interested in writing novelizations for Seth MacFarlane’s The Orville.

David has been an outspoken fan of the new Fox sci-fi series, talking it up on his Twitter and even reviewing episodes in some detail for his Patreon supporters. There’s been no official talk yet from Fox regarding the possibility of Orville novels — they haven’t even renewed the series yet — but if they go that route, Peter David would be a strong choice. 

David penned the Star Trek: The Next Generation hardcover Imzadi, bringing readers the intimate details of the pre-show romance between Enterprise First Officer William Riker and Counselor Deanna Troi. He also wrote the majority of the New Frontier series, which followed the USS Excalibur, a ship we never saw in a Trek show or film. Much like The Orville’s leads, the Excalibur’s captain and first officer have a failed romance in their past. This couple, though, ends up rekindling their relationship and, like Troi and Riker, are married by the series conclusion.

While it’s unlikely that Fox would let David end the will-they/won’t-they tension between the Orville’s Captain Ed Mercer (MacFarlane) and his ex-wife/First Officer Kelly Greyson (Adrianne Palicki) off-screen, David definitely has the experience to build out the pair’s backstory for the show’s superfans. His work on Trek novels like Q-in-Law, where the omnipotent trickster woos Lwaxana Troi, shows that he has the comedic chops as well.

What do you think? Would The Orville lose its magic if it left the small screen, or is there enough meat behind the humor to merit full-length novels? Let us know in the comments!

The Orville airs Thursdays at 9 PM on Fox. 


Images: Fox, Pocket Books

Peter David Wants to Write Novels About The Orville

The Star Trek novelist and comic book writer is volunteering to expand on The Orville...

By Johnny Kolasinski | 10/17/2017 10:00 AM PT

News

Novelist and comic book writer Peter David, best known for dozens of Star Trek novelizations and for his work on Marvel comics like The Incredible Hulk, hinted this week on Twitter that he’d be very interested in writing novelizations for Seth MacFarlane’s The Orville.

David has been an outspoken fan of the new Fox sci-fi series, talking it up on his Twitter and even reviewing episodes in some detail for his Patreon supporters. There’s been no official talk yet from Fox regarding the possibility of Orville novels — they haven’t even renewed the series yet — but if they go that route, Peter David would be a strong choice. 

David penned the Star Trek: The Next Generation hardcover Imzadi, bringing readers the intimate details of the pre-show romance between Enterprise First Officer William Riker and Counselor Deanna Troi. He also wrote the majority of the New Frontier series, which followed the USS Excalibur, a ship we never saw in a Trek show or film. Much like The Orville’s leads, the Excalibur’s captain and first officer have a failed romance in their past. This couple, though, ends up rekindling their relationship and, like Troi and Riker, are married by the series conclusion.

While it’s unlikely that Fox would let David end the will-they/won’t-they tension between the Orville’s Captain Ed Mercer (MacFarlane) and his ex-wife/First Officer Kelly Greyson (Adrianne Palicki) off-screen, David definitely has the experience to build out the pair’s backstory for the show’s superfans. His work on Trek novels like Q-in-Law, where the omnipotent trickster woos Lwaxana Troi, shows that he has the comedic chops as well.

What do you think? Would The Orville lose its magic if it left the small screen, or is there enough meat behind the humor to merit full-length novels? Let us know in the comments!

The Orville airs Thursdays at 9 PM on Fox. 


Images: Fox, Pocket Books

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