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In an unexpected post on their blog February 1st, Rockstar Games announced another delay for Red Dead Redemption 2, advising they’ll take the additional time to ensure the game is up to snuff by the time of its release. However, while moving the date forward several months, Rockstar finally provided a specified launch date instead of the previous vague windows of Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 respectively: Red Dead 2 will now launch on October 26, 2018.

True to Rockstar’s reputation, the post is brief and to the point:

Dear All,
We are excited to announce that Red Dead Redemption 2 will be released on October 26th 2018. We apologize to everyone disappointed by this delay. While we had hoped to have the game out sooner, we require a little extra time for polish.

We sincerely thank you for your patience and hope that when you get to play the game, you will agree the wait will have been worth it. In the meantime, please check out these screenshots from the game. We look forward to sharing a lot more information with you in the coming weeks.

With thanks,
Rockstar Games

It’s not entirely shocking for Rockstar to delay Red Dead a second time. The studio is well-known for pushing release dates back, and in the last five years, it’s started to seem like more release dates are changed than actually met. A game’s development schedule has never been easy to predict, and publishers all over the industry are learning that, barring some extreme exceptions (Final Fantasy XV chief among those), delays can be worth the extra time and cost, and consumers are a patient bunch.

With Rockstar specifically, delays have never caused a discernible black mark on their bottom line, so the decision to extend development for a short while longer should have been a relatively easy one. It also helps that Red Dead Redemption 2 is going to be an absolute monster, sales-wise, no matter what happens.

We may never know what elements need further polish from the development team, but whenever a modern game is delayed pretty close to launch, we always speculate it could be online components. Rockstar is coming off of one of the most successful multiplayer modes in a game ever with Grand Theft Auto Online, and the whole world expects Red Dead 2‘s online mode will be equally important. It’s entirely possible that Rockstar’s fine-tuning and stress testing the new online system to ensure it’s the best (and most profitable) system possible by the time the game goes live.


Images: Rockstar Games

Source: Rockstar Games

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About Dan Capelluto-Woizinski

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Dan is a lifelong fan of pop culture who contributes to GEEK as an attempt to legitimize thousands of hours lost sitting on the couch with a TV remote in one hand and controller in the other.

Red Dead Redemption 2’s Release Date Announced, But Delayed

But maybe seven gorgeous new screenshots can soften blow?

By Dan Capelluto-Woizinski | 02/2/2018 03:00 PM PT

News

In an unexpected post on their blog February 1st, Rockstar Games announced another delay for Red Dead Redemption 2, advising they’ll take the additional time to ensure the game is up to snuff by the time of its release. However, while moving the date forward several months, Rockstar finally provided a specified launch date instead of the previous vague windows of Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 respectively: Red Dead 2 will now launch on October 26, 2018.

True to Rockstar’s reputation, the post is brief and to the point:

Dear All,
We are excited to announce that Red Dead Redemption 2 will be released on October 26th 2018. We apologize to everyone disappointed by this delay. While we had hoped to have the game out sooner, we require a little extra time for polish.

We sincerely thank you for your patience and hope that when you get to play the game, you will agree the wait will have been worth it. In the meantime, please check out these screenshots from the game. We look forward to sharing a lot more information with you in the coming weeks.

With thanks,
Rockstar Games

It’s not entirely shocking for Rockstar to delay Red Dead a second time. The studio is well-known for pushing release dates back, and in the last five years, it’s started to seem like more release dates are changed than actually met. A game’s development schedule has never been easy to predict, and publishers all over the industry are learning that, barring some extreme exceptions (Final Fantasy XV chief among those), delays can be worth the extra time and cost, and consumers are a patient bunch.

With Rockstar specifically, delays have never caused a discernible black mark on their bottom line, so the decision to extend development for a short while longer should have been a relatively easy one. It also helps that Red Dead Redemption 2 is going to be an absolute monster, sales-wise, no matter what happens.

We may never know what elements need further polish from the development team, but whenever a modern game is delayed pretty close to launch, we always speculate it could be online components. Rockstar is coming off of one of the most successful multiplayer modes in a game ever with Grand Theft Auto Online, and the whole world expects Red Dead 2‘s online mode will be equally important. It’s entirely possible that Rockstar’s fine-tuning and stress testing the new online system to ensure it’s the best (and most profitable) system possible by the time the game goes live.


Images: Rockstar Games

Source: Rockstar Games

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0   POINTS



Connect

About Dan Capelluto-Woizinski

view all posts

Dan is a lifelong fan of pop culture who contributes to GEEK as an attempt to legitimize thousands of hours lost sitting on the couch with a TV remote in one hand and controller in the other.