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Like Sisyphus before him, the modern man deals with an eternal struggle. No, it is not our impending mortality or the ongoing questions about our place in the universe that plague us. It’s getting from the couch to the fridge that causes us strife. Thankfully, a new robot solves this issue and more.

Showcased at this year’s CES, Aeolus Robotics has finally revealed their flagship product. Equipped with a modular attachment on its left arm, their robot can manipulate somewhat delicate objects such as cups, grip a vacuum cleaner, or even move a chair for you. The robot also features image recognition technology that allows it to identify thousands of household items, meaning it can assist in the search the next time you lose your glasses.

The robot features an expressive “face”.

While existing robots that can provide these series of functions cost hundreds of thousands to build, Aeolus Robotics’ new device is decidedly less expensive. Speaking with The Verge during their presentation at CES, the company assured that the final product would cost less than $20,000. It’s certainly not within the grasp of the average family, but given its complexity, it’s a lot less expensive than the alternatives on the market.

Though the robot is ambitious, Aeolus Robotics believes they’ll be able to get it to the market later this year. But, as to how many they can sell is anyone’s question. There may be an immediate use in hospitality and commercial cleaning though, as the robots could be deployed to help clean or return objects to their original space within a hotel, home, etc.

As this technology continues to evolve, these robots may become affordable for the average home before we know it. Then maybe we can all live as well as Paulie did in Rocky IV


Images: Aeolus Robotics

Source: The Verge

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About Jason Lamb

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Jason works at a university up in the frozen north that is Canada, where he spends too much time with technology.

The End Is Near: Meet the Beer-From-Fridge Robot

It can even clean your house after grabbing you a cold one!

By Jason Lamb | 01/12/2018 06:30 AM PT

News

Like Sisyphus before him, the modern man deals with an eternal struggle. No, it is not our impending mortality or the ongoing questions about our place in the universe that plague us. It’s getting from the couch to the fridge that causes us strife. Thankfully, a new robot solves this issue and more.

Showcased at this year’s CES, Aeolus Robotics has finally revealed their flagship product. Equipped with a modular attachment on its left arm, their robot can manipulate somewhat delicate objects such as cups, grip a vacuum cleaner, or even move a chair for you. The robot also features image recognition technology that allows it to identify thousands of household items, meaning it can assist in the search the next time you lose your glasses.

The robot features an expressive “face”.

While existing robots that can provide these series of functions cost hundreds of thousands to build, Aeolus Robotics’ new device is decidedly less expensive. Speaking with The Verge during their presentation at CES, the company assured that the final product would cost less than $20,000. It’s certainly not within the grasp of the average family, but given its complexity, it’s a lot less expensive than the alternatives on the market.

Though the robot is ambitious, Aeolus Robotics believes they’ll be able to get it to the market later this year. But, as to how many they can sell is anyone’s question. There may be an immediate use in hospitality and commercial cleaning though, as the robots could be deployed to help clean or return objects to their original space within a hotel, home, etc.

As this technology continues to evolve, these robots may become affordable for the average home before we know it. Then maybe we can all live as well as Paulie did in Rocky IV


Images: Aeolus Robotics

Source: The Verge

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About Jason Lamb

view all posts

Jason works at a university up in the frozen north that is Canada, where he spends too much time with technology.