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Preacher


 

Though there have been some small ups and downs, this season of Preacher has been very good and last night they capped it off with an outstanding season finale. Almost everything they’ve been teasing throughout the season is paid off in this episode making it a very gratifying watch. Perhaps more important than the answers and revelations found in the episode are the brand new problems that crop up as the episode progresses.

The episode actually opens up with a young Jesse hustling folks for his mother’s side of the family, the L’Angell’s. You might remember that name popping up a couple of episodes ago when we saw flashbacks of a young Jesse being forced to renounce his father’s name. Though the purpose of the scene becomes clear later in the episode, what’s particularly interesting is Jesse’s reaction to having killed the chicken in frustration. Stomping on the bird sated his rage briefly before he was quickly overcome with guilt. The moment is almost a microcosm of Jesse’s personality as it’s been laid out thus far in the series.

Following the flashback open to the episode, we’re treated to arguably the best fight scene of the season as Jesse is forced to thrash some Armenian terrorists hired by Herr Starr to essentially fabricate an event showing Jesse using Genesis. There are a couple of notable things about the fight itself. The first is that he plays it off to Starr as simply not needing to use Genesis to stop them which isn’t exactly true. The last few episodes Jesse’s ability to use Genesis to control people has appeared to be waning of late and that is confirmed here in the finale. Second is that they made a point of showing how much Jesse seems to enjoy a good fight, especially when he has some frustrations to exorcise.

Meanwhile, both Tulip and Cassidy are undergoing their own inner struggles as they continue to pack for their trip to Bimini. Tulip is frustrated and is having trouble cutting ties and leaving Jesse though she doesn’t say so outwardly. Cassidy, on the other hand, is increasingly troubled by Denis’ behavior since turning him into a vampire. These scenes, in particular, are really sold by the acting though, without Ruth Negga and Joe Gilgun turning in great performances the scenes likely would have fallen flat.

This is especially true of Gilgun when Cassidy snaps and pushes Denis into the sunlight killing him – his own son. Not to say it wasn’t the right thing to do, Denis was acting on impulses that Cassidy more or less keeps a lid on. It’s even at least partially behind his motivation for killing Denis. With him there he didn’t feel completely in control of himself as Denis was urging him to give in to his nature.

In Hell, Eugene and Hitler complete their escape and make it back to the world of the living. The sequence is quite interesting though. First and foremost we see there’s apparent in fighting now that God is missing as the demon running Eugene’s cell block kills the apparition that ferry’s people back to the world of the living despite being out of her own jurisdiction. It shows that with God gone everything is truly beginning to devolve into general disarray and dysfunction. Additionally, Eugene makes a HUGE mistake when he’s duped into feeling sympathy for Hitler because he helped him escape the bowels of Hell. Once top side though he quickly realizes his error as Hitler runs off, it will be fun to say the least to see how this plays out going forward in the series.

Later in the episode, as Jesse is feeling some doubt about the path he’s heading down, he gets a call from Cassidy. The moment itself is shown in such a way that it’s obviously important as it’s Jesse’s line back to his friends but he appears to feel equally uncertain as to whether he should answer. Ultimately he does only to hear the news that Tulip was shot. Having figured out that their neighbors were the ones spying on them for Herr Starr, Tulip confronts agent Featherstone and it doesn’t go well for her. This event leads us to probably the best scene in the episode as Jesse and Cassidy fight while Tulip is bleeding out on the floor. Jesse can’t use Genesis to help her, his power seems lost and Cassidy becomes convinced that turning her is the only way to save her. Jesse won’t have it and lets her die. Once again, Gilgun is fantastic in this scene as is Dominic Cooper as they both watch the woman they care for bleed out.

The episode closes with Jesse and Cassidy taking Tulip to Angellville, home of the L’Angell’s leaving us with a mighty major cliffhanger considering that Tulip is not currently among the living.

Lastly, here are a couple of other notes:

  • Herr Starr reveals to Jesse that he has the rest of his soul.
  • We see what appears to be God’s motel room and a blinding white light as God exits the bathroom.

On the whole, this was a fantastic season two finale of Preacher. The narrative makes a serious jump and the relationship between the trio of Jesse, Tulip, and Cassidy appears to be in shambles – not to mention a crazy cliffhanger.

GEEK Grade: A+

There’s a lot to look forward too should AMC give the show a green light for a third season which has as of yet not been announced.


Images: AMC
Written by Sam Catlin
Directed by Wayne Yip

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About Cody Stasiak

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The kind of Geek that has several shelves on my book case dedicated to Star Wars novels. Star Wars is essentially a way of life for me. Other things are cool too. Generally a big fan/critic of movies, I try to go to the theater once a week. There's a lot of great TV out there too, chances are if I can, I'll write about the stuff I love. I dig the Marvel and D.C. universes so far...except Suicide Squad...that was a disappointment. I love a lot of music but I gravitate to alternative and punk. The Libertines are my absolute favorite. Michigan born and raised and I root for my home teams; Tigers, Lions, Red Wings, Pistons and Spartans.

Preacher 2.13 – The End of the Road

The season two finale of Preacher is the season's strongest episode and closes with a major cliffhanger.

By Cody Stasiak | 09/12/2017 06:00 PM PT

Reviews

Though there have been some small ups and downs, this season of Preacher has been very good and last night they capped it off with an outstanding season finale. Almost everything they’ve been teasing throughout the season is paid off in this episode making it a very gratifying watch. Perhaps more important than the answers and revelations found in the episode are the brand new problems that crop up as the episode progresses.

The episode actually opens up with a young Jesse hustling folks for his mother’s side of the family, the L’Angell’s. You might remember that name popping up a couple of episodes ago when we saw flashbacks of a young Jesse being forced to renounce his father’s name. Though the purpose of the scene becomes clear later in the episode, what’s particularly interesting is Jesse’s reaction to having killed the chicken in frustration. Stomping on the bird sated his rage briefly before he was quickly overcome with guilt. The moment is almost a microcosm of Jesse’s personality as it’s been laid out thus far in the series.

Following the flashback open to the episode, we’re treated to arguably the best fight scene of the season as Jesse is forced to thrash some Armenian terrorists hired by Herr Starr to essentially fabricate an event showing Jesse using Genesis. There are a couple of notable things about the fight itself. The first is that he plays it off to Starr as simply not needing to use Genesis to stop them which isn’t exactly true. The last few episodes Jesse’s ability to use Genesis to control people has appeared to be waning of late and that is confirmed here in the finale. Second is that they made a point of showing how much Jesse seems to enjoy a good fight, especially when he has some frustrations to exorcise.

Meanwhile, both Tulip and Cassidy are undergoing their own inner struggles as they continue to pack for their trip to Bimini. Tulip is frustrated and is having trouble cutting ties and leaving Jesse though she doesn’t say so outwardly. Cassidy, on the other hand, is increasingly troubled by Denis’ behavior since turning him into a vampire. These scenes, in particular, are really sold by the acting though, without Ruth Negga and Joe Gilgun turning in great performances the scenes likely would have fallen flat.

This is especially true of Gilgun when Cassidy snaps and pushes Denis into the sunlight killing him – his own son. Not to say it wasn’t the right thing to do, Denis was acting on impulses that Cassidy more or less keeps a lid on. It’s even at least partially behind his motivation for killing Denis. With him there he didn’t feel completely in control of himself as Denis was urging him to give in to his nature.

In Hell, Eugene and Hitler complete their escape and make it back to the world of the living. The sequence is quite interesting though. First and foremost we see there’s apparent in fighting now that God is missing as the demon running Eugene’s cell block kills the apparition that ferry’s people back to the world of the living despite being out of her own jurisdiction. It shows that with God gone everything is truly beginning to devolve into general disarray and dysfunction. Additionally, Eugene makes a HUGE mistake when he’s duped into feeling sympathy for Hitler because he helped him escape the bowels of Hell. Once top side though he quickly realizes his error as Hitler runs off, it will be fun to say the least to see how this plays out going forward in the series.

Later in the episode, as Jesse is feeling some doubt about the path he’s heading down, he gets a call from Cassidy. The moment itself is shown in such a way that it’s obviously important as it’s Jesse’s line back to his friends but he appears to feel equally uncertain as to whether he should answer. Ultimately he does only to hear the news that Tulip was shot. Having figured out that their neighbors were the ones spying on them for Herr Starr, Tulip confronts agent Featherstone and it doesn’t go well for her. This event leads us to probably the best scene in the episode as Jesse and Cassidy fight while Tulip is bleeding out on the floor. Jesse can’t use Genesis to help her, his power seems lost and Cassidy becomes convinced that turning her is the only way to save her. Jesse won’t have it and lets her die. Once again, Gilgun is fantastic in this scene as is Dominic Cooper as they both watch the woman they care for bleed out.

The episode closes with Jesse and Cassidy taking Tulip to Angellville, home of the L’Angell’s leaving us with a mighty major cliffhanger considering that Tulip is not currently among the living.

Lastly, here are a couple of other notes:

  • Herr Starr reveals to Jesse that he has the rest of his soul.
  • We see what appears to be God’s motel room and a blinding white light as God exits the bathroom.

On the whole, this was a fantastic season two finale of Preacher. The narrative makes a serious jump and the relationship between the trio of Jesse, Tulip, and Cassidy appears to be in shambles – not to mention a crazy cliffhanger.

GEEK Grade: A+

There’s a lot to look forward too should AMC give the show a green light for a third season which has as of yet not been announced.


Images: AMC
Written by Sam Catlin
Directed by Wayne Yip

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



Connect

About Cody Stasiak

view all posts

The kind of Geek that has several shelves on my book case dedicated to Star Wars novels. Star Wars is essentially a way of life for me. Other things are cool too. Generally a big fan/critic of movies, I try to go to the theater once a week. There's a lot of great TV out there too, chances are if I can, I'll write about the stuff I love. I dig the Marvel and D.C. universes so far...except Suicide Squad...that was a disappointment. I love a lot of music but I gravitate to alternative and punk. The Libertines are my absolute favorite. Michigan born and raised and I root for my home teams; Tigers, Lions, Red Wings, Pistons and Spartans.