X

REGISTER TO CUSTOMIZE
YOUR NEWS AND GET ALERTS
ON Ni No Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom Delayed (Again)

Click the box below to confirm you are over 13, not a robot, and agree to our Privacy Policy & Terms and Conditions
No thanks, take me to
X
Customize your news
for instant alerts on
Ni No Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom Delayed (Again)
Register below
(it only takes seconds)
Click the box below to confirm you are over 13, not a robot, and agree to our Privacy Policy & Terms and Conditions


X
X
 

Ni No Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom has been delayed to March 23, 2018, marking the second delay in its development. The game was originally planned to launch in November 2017, but in early Summer developer Level-5 announced they were pushing the release to January 19th, 2018.

Speaking about the decision to delay Ni No Kuni II again, Bandai Namco said:

“We are committed to delivering the highest levels of quality and innovation in each of our titles. The development of Ni no Kuni II is coming along very nicely and we can’t wait to share this new adventure with you. However, with that innovation and quality comes the need to ensure everything works together in a fun and cohesive way, this means we’ll need a bit more time to make sure the entire Ni no Kuni II experience meets our highest quality standards. So today, we would like to ask for everyone’s patience as we move Ni no Kuni II’s worldwide release date to March 23, 2018. On behalf of everyone at Bandai Namco, we want to thank you all for your patience and continued support.”

In conjunction with the delay, the studio put out a new trailer to showcase the game’s Japanese voice cast.

For those excited to get their hands on the Studio Ghibli-inspired RPG, news of a second delay could be disheartening, but it’s worth remembering that delays are a frequent element in game development, and more often than not the decision to take more time leads to a better, finished product. For example, Ni No Kuni II‘s first delay allowed the team to introduce two new game modes into Ni No Kuni II involving its sprite-like creatures called Higgledies: The first, skirmishes, is a whole different type of combat scenario from the one featured in the rest of the game, while the second allows the player to develop a growing populated kingdom over time.

We’ve been looking forward to Ni No Kuni II since we saw the vast gameplay improvements being made to the gameplay elements. The first game is beautiful and has all the charm of one of Hayao Miyazaki’s films, but it was lacking to some degree in most aspects of actual game design. Revenant Kingdom looks like a complete overhaul that’ll make playing in the game a lot more satisfying.

This latest delay puts Ni No Kuni II right into 2018’s most hectic month, with several of the most anticipated games of the year (Far Cry 5, Yakuza 6, Sea of Thieves and potentially God of War) launching in that window. Hopefully, Ni No Kuni II won’t get buried under the competition.


Images: Bandai Namco

Source: Polygon

0   POINTS
0   POINTS


Connect

About Dan Capelluto-Woizinski

view all posts

Dan is a lifelong fan of pop culture who contributes to GEEK as an attempt to legitimize thousands of hours lost sitting on the couch with a TV remote in one hand and controller in the other.

Ni No Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom Delayed (Again)

Bandai Namco announced the gorgeous-looking RPG needs a bit more time to cook.

By Dan Capelluto-Woizinski | 12/15/2017 03:00 PM PT

News

Ni No Kuni II: Revenant Kingdom has been delayed to March 23, 2018, marking the second delay in its development. The game was originally planned to launch in November 2017, but in early Summer developer Level-5 announced they were pushing the release to January 19th, 2018.

Speaking about the decision to delay Ni No Kuni II again, Bandai Namco said:

“We are committed to delivering the highest levels of quality and innovation in each of our titles. The development of Ni no Kuni II is coming along very nicely and we can’t wait to share this new adventure with you. However, with that innovation and quality comes the need to ensure everything works together in a fun and cohesive way, this means we’ll need a bit more time to make sure the entire Ni no Kuni II experience meets our highest quality standards. So today, we would like to ask for everyone’s patience as we move Ni no Kuni II’s worldwide release date to March 23, 2018. On behalf of everyone at Bandai Namco, we want to thank you all for your patience and continued support.”

In conjunction with the delay, the studio put out a new trailer to showcase the game’s Japanese voice cast.

For those excited to get their hands on the Studio Ghibli-inspired RPG, news of a second delay could be disheartening, but it’s worth remembering that delays are a frequent element in game development, and more often than not the decision to take more time leads to a better, finished product. For example, Ni No Kuni II‘s first delay allowed the team to introduce two new game modes into Ni No Kuni II involving its sprite-like creatures called Higgledies: The first, skirmishes, is a whole different type of combat scenario from the one featured in the rest of the game, while the second allows the player to develop a growing populated kingdom over time.

We’ve been looking forward to Ni No Kuni II since we saw the vast gameplay improvements being made to the gameplay elements. The first game is beautiful and has all the charm of one of Hayao Miyazaki’s films, but it was lacking to some degree in most aspects of actual game design. Revenant Kingdom looks like a complete overhaul that’ll make playing in the game a lot more satisfying.

This latest delay puts Ni No Kuni II right into 2018’s most hectic month, with several of the most anticipated games of the year (Far Cry 5, Yakuza 6, Sea of Thieves and potentially God of War) launching in that window. Hopefully, Ni No Kuni II won’t get buried under the competition.


Images: Bandai Namco

Source: Polygon

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



Connect

About Dan Capelluto-Woizinski

view all posts

Dan is a lifelong fan of pop culture who contributes to GEEK as an attempt to legitimize thousands of hours lost sitting on the couch with a TV remote in one hand and controller in the other.