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Back n the ’90s, a lot of up and coming filmmakers got their break directing music videos, some of which were essentially short films, full of depth and a skilled aesthetic, and disguised as pop music fluff, so as to be more easily digestible to the masses. Names like Spike Jonze, David Fincher, and Marc Webb are all known to us because of musicians like The Beastie Boys, Madonna, and Green Day. And long before he gave us Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Michael Gondry was making music videos for Bjork and The White Stripes.

However, since the last bastion of all that was cool – MTV – moved away from their roots, and became a sanctuary for reality shows and entitled teenagers, we’ve lost the mass exposure that music videos once offered filmmakers. What we have instead is the internet. And while the web offers limitless possibilities to get your work seen, it also offers no guarantees. So you roll the dice and hope that your project can go viral, relying on people to share it around and hoping the web community as a whole will understand and appreciate what you’ve offered.

Which brings us to the art of the short film. Short films often open the door for more ambitious endeavors, absent the constraints that large studio involvement demands, though lacking the funding that would come with it. Well, one studio that has proven to value the art of the short film is the Dutch company PostPanic Pictures. They made news previously with the short film Sundays, and now they’ve released Lost Boy.

PPictures_Lostboy_B_0002_03

Here’s the synopsis;

Year unknown. Population Zero. Welcome to LOST BOY.

Following in the footsteps of SUNDAYS, their debut concept short success which turned heads worldwide last year, comes LOST BOY, the hugely awaited punk sci-fi feature project which is next in-line from visionary outfit PostPanic Pictures.

Directed by Ash Thorp and Anthony Scott Burns, this LOST BOY concept short lays down the gauntlet once again by showcasing the creative ambitions of Hollywood’s next generation of storytellers.

LOST BOY is an ambitious sci-fi concept heavily influenced by the American action classics and Japanese samurai films. LOST BOY represents the second feature in a series of director-driven film projects from the Amsterdam-based production company, PostPanic Pictures.

Let’s take a look…

Felt a little like 1984’s The Terminator with some Blade Runner themes mixed in? Is that too much? Probably, but it’s still pretty cool. The classic ’80s punk aesthetic mixes well with the post-apocalyptic setting, and for fans of that old school gritty dystopian style, Lost Boy delivers something new. If there is one knock on the production, it would be the runtime is almost too short. Burns and Thorp do a great job of pulling the viewer into the story without us knowing anything about the stakes, or motivations of our characters. Don’t be shocked if we see more from this story some day.


Images: PostPanic Pictures

Source: Geek Tyrant

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About Brian Kronner

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After years spent at various sites, Kronner finally found a home at Geek Magazine in 2012. Now, he mostly just waits for that inevitable "Terriers: Season 2" announcement to come, forever stuck in a delusional haze of optimism. Or whatever the opposite of that is.

Short Film Lost Boy Blends ’80s Style With Modern Film Technology

“Our future is full of bold ideas, but none so bold as the idea that we may not have one.”

By Brian Kronner | 11/21/2016 07:00 AM PT

Video

Back n the ’90s, a lot of up and coming filmmakers got their break directing music videos, some of which were essentially short films, full of depth and a skilled aesthetic, and disguised as pop music fluff, so as to be more easily digestible to the masses. Names like Spike Jonze, David Fincher, and Marc Webb are all known to us because of musicians like The Beastie Boys, Madonna, and Green Day. And long before he gave us Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Michael Gondry was making music videos for Bjork and The White Stripes.

However, since the last bastion of all that was cool – MTV – moved away from their roots, and became a sanctuary for reality shows and entitled teenagers, we’ve lost the mass exposure that music videos once offered filmmakers. What we have instead is the internet. And while the web offers limitless possibilities to get your work seen, it also offers no guarantees. So you roll the dice and hope that your project can go viral, relying on people to share it around and hoping the web community as a whole will understand and appreciate what you’ve offered.

Which brings us to the art of the short film. Short films often open the door for more ambitious endeavors, absent the constraints that large studio involvement demands, though lacking the funding that would come with it. Well, one studio that has proven to value the art of the short film is the Dutch company PostPanic Pictures. They made news previously with the short film Sundays, and now they’ve released Lost Boy.

PPictures_Lostboy_B_0002_03

Here’s the synopsis;

Year unknown. Population Zero. Welcome to LOST BOY.

Following in the footsteps of SUNDAYS, their debut concept short success which turned heads worldwide last year, comes LOST BOY, the hugely awaited punk sci-fi feature project which is next in-line from visionary outfit PostPanic Pictures.

Directed by Ash Thorp and Anthony Scott Burns, this LOST BOY concept short lays down the gauntlet once again by showcasing the creative ambitions of Hollywood’s next generation of storytellers.

LOST BOY is an ambitious sci-fi concept heavily influenced by the American action classics and Japanese samurai films. LOST BOY represents the second feature in a series of director-driven film projects from the Amsterdam-based production company, PostPanic Pictures.

Let’s take a look…

Felt a little like 1984’s The Terminator with some Blade Runner themes mixed in? Is that too much? Probably, but it’s still pretty cool. The classic ’80s punk aesthetic mixes well with the post-apocalyptic setting, and for fans of that old school gritty dystopian style, Lost Boy delivers something new. If there is one knock on the production, it would be the runtime is almost too short. Burns and Thorp do a great job of pulling the viewer into the story without us knowing anything about the stakes, or motivations of our characters. Don’t be shocked if we see more from this story some day.


Images: PostPanic Pictures

Source: Geek Tyrant

0   POINTS
0   POINTS



Connect

About Brian Kronner

view all posts

After years spent at various sites, Kronner finally found a home at Geek Magazine in 2012. Now, he mostly just waits for that inevitable "Terriers: Season 2" announcement to come, forever stuck in a delusional haze of optimism. Or whatever the opposite of that is.